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Geography

Our aim is to ensure KS5 students will be informed, engaged, and active global citizens who know and appreciate their role and place in the world. Geographers at Ashton Park will be able to identify the opportunities and challenges that face the world and evaluate solutions to help manage it. We want students to engage with this by investigating how the natural world works, how humans interact with the world, and the impacts they have on the environment. We want them to ask questions about the world and develop the range of skills needed to allow them to explore it in the classroom and beyond so wherever life takes them they can be confident global citizens.

 

Please note we are currently changing the exam board we study in Geography so our current Year 12 and current Year 13 are studying different curriculums. Each of these is described below.

 

Curriculum for our current Year 12

 

Exam board for 2021 cohort onwards:

Edexcel A-Level Geography

 

Number of assessments:

4 in total

  • 1 x 2 hour 15 minutes Exam (Physical) (30%)
  • 1 x 2 hour 15 minutes Exam (Human) (30%)
  • 1 x 2 hour 15 minutes Exam (Synoptic Themes) (20%)
  • NEA Independent Investigation 3000-4000 words (20%)

 

Our Year 12 curriculum:

Teacher 1: Year 12 Physical Geography Teacher 2: Year 12 Human Geography

Term 1 and 2

Tectonic Hazards:

Tectonic hazards – earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and secondary hazards such as tsunamis – represent a significant risk in some parts of the world. This is especially the case where active tectonic plate boundaries interact with areas of high population density and low levels of development. Resilience in these places can be low, and the interaction of physical systems with vulnerable populations can result in major disasters. An in-depth understanding of the causes of tectonic hazards is key to both increasing the degree to which they can be managed, and putting in place successful responses that can mitigate social and economic impacts and allow humans to adapt to hazard occurrence.

 

 

Term 3 and 4:

Landscape Systems, Processes and Change: Coasts

 

Coastal landscapes develop due to the interaction of winds, waves and currents, as well as through the contribution of both terrestrial and offshore sources of sediment. These flows of energy and variations in sediment budgets interact with the prevailing geological and lithological characteristics of the coast to operate as coastal systems and produce distinctive coastal landscapes, including those in rocky, sandy and estuarine coastlines. These landscapes are increasingly threatened from physical processes and human activities, and there is a need for holistic and sustainable management of these areas in all the world’s coasts. Study must include examples of landscapes from inside and outside the UK.

 

Term 5 and 6

Synoptic Themes:

This specification contains three synoptic themes. These are over-arching themes designed to help students make links between different geographical themes, ideas and concepts. The synoptic themes incorporate specialist geographical concepts, namely: causality, systems, feedback, inequality, identity, globalisation, interdependence, mitigation and adaption, sustainability, risk, resilience and thresholds. In this qualification, Paper 3 is a synoptic investigation that will link explicitly and/or implicitly to these synoptic themes and will incorporate key concepts.

Term 1 and 2

Globalisation:

Globalisation and global interdependence continue to accelerate, resulting in changing opportunities for businesses and people. Inequalities are caused within and between countries as shifts in patterns of wealth occur. Cultural impacts on the identity of communities increase as flows of ideas, people and goods take place. Recognising that both tensions in communities and pressures on environments are likely, will help players implement sustainable solutions.

 

Term 3 and 4:

Regenerating Places:

Local places vary economically and socially with change driven by local, national and global processes. These processes include movements of people, capital, information and resources, making some places economically dynamic while other places appear to be marginalised. This creates and exacerbates considerable economic and social inequalities both between and within local areas. Urban and rural regeneration programmes involving a range of players involve both place making (regeneration) and place marketing (rebranding). Regeneration programmes impact variably on people both in terms of their lived experience of change and their perception and attachment to places. The relative success of regeneration and rebranding for individuals and groups depends on the extent to which lived experience, perceptions, and attachments to places are changed. Students should begin by studying the place in which they live or study in order to look at economic change and social inequalities. They will then put this local place in context in order to understand how regional, national, international and global influences have led to changes there. They should then study one further contrasting place through which they will develop their wider knowledge and understanding about how places change and are shaped. A local place may be a locality, a neighbourhood or a small community, either urban or rural.

 

Term 5 and 6

NEA Independent Investigation:

The purpose of this non-examination assessment is to test students’ skills in independent investigation. Students are required to undertake an independent investigation that involves (but which need not be restricted to) fieldwork. The focus of the investigation must be derived from the specification the student is studying. The guidance for word length is 3000-4000 words. The student defines a question or issue relating to the compulsory or optional content. The student’s investigation will incorporate fieldwork data (collected individually or as part of a group) and own research and/or secondary data. The student’s report will evidence independent analysis and evaluation of data, presentation of data findings and extended writing.

Why is the course sequenced this way?

The course is structured in this way to allow students to see both Physical and Human Geography side by side. The difficulty of the topics increases through the year and then into year 13 with students tackling shorter questions in their first two topics to then be introduced to the longer 20 mark questions in their second human and physical topics. In Year 13 the topics use what they have learnt in Year 12 to improve their knowledge even further and establish synoptic links throughout the course.

How will I be assessed during the course?

  • Regular exam questions in lessons to test your Geographical skills
  • Short low stakes knowledge quizzes to test your knowledge
  • Longer end of unit mock exams to consolidate everything we have done so far

 

Curriculum for our current Year 13

 

Exam board for current Year 13’s:

AQA  A-Level Geography

 

Number of assessments:

3 in total

  • 1 x 2 hour 30 minutes Exam (Physical) (40%)
  • 1 x 2 hour 30 minutes Exam (Human) (40%)
  • NEA Independent Investigation 3000-4000 words (20%)

 

Our Year 13 curriculum

Teacher 1: Year 13 Physical Geography Teacher 2: Year 13 Human Geography

Term 1

NEA:

Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content.

 

Term 2:

Coastal Systems:

This section of our specification focuses on coastal zones, which are dynamic environments in which landscapes develop by the interaction of winds, waves, currents and terrestrial and marine sediments. The operation and outcomes of fundamental geomorphological processes and their association with distinctive landscapes are readily observable. In common with water and carbon cycles, a systems approach to study is specified. Student engagement with subject content fosters an informed appreciation of the beauty and diversity of coasts and their importance as human habitats. The section offers the opportunity to exercise and develop observation skills, measurement and geospatial mapping skills, together with data manipulation and statistical skills, including those associated with and arising from fieldwork.

 

Term 3 and 4

Hazards:

This optional section of our specification focuses on the lithosphere and the atmosphere, which intermittently but regularly present natural hazards to human populations, often in dramatic and sometimes catastrophic fashion. By exploring the origin and nature of these hazards and the various ways in which people respond to them, students are able to engage with many dimensions of the relationships between people and the environments they occupy. Study of this section offers the opportunity to exercise and develop observation skills, measurement and geospatial mapping skills, together with data manipulation and statistical skills, including those associated with and arising from fieldwork.

 

Term 5

Revision

Term 1

NEA:

Students complete an individual investigation which must include data collected in the field. The individual investigation must be based on a question or issue defined and developed by the student relating to any part of the specification content.

 

Term 2 and 3:

Changing Places:

This section of our specification focuses on people's engagement with places, their experience of them and the qualities they ascribe to them, all of which are of fundamental importance in their lives. Students acknowledge this importance and engage with how places are known and experienced, how their character is appreciated, the factors and processes which impact upon places and how they change and develop over time. Through developing this knowledge, students will gain understanding of the way in which their own lives and those of others are affected by continuity and change in the nature of places which are of fundamental importance in their lives.

Study of the content must be embedded in two contrasting places, one to be local. The local place may be a locality, neighborhood or small community either urban or rural. A contrasting place is likely to be distant – it could be in the same country or a different country but it must show significant contrast in terms of economic development and/or population density and/or cultural background and/or systems of political and economic organisation. The place studies complement the requirement to embed the study of content in two contrasting places. Study of this section offers particular opportunities to exercise and develop qualitative (and quantitative) investigative techniques and practice-related observation, measurement and various mapping skills, together with data manipulation and statistical skills including those associated with and arising from fieldwork.

 

Term 4 and 5

Revision

 

 

How will I be assessed during the course?

  • Regular exam questions in lessons to test your Geographical skills
  • Short low stakes knowledge quizzes to test your knowledge
  • Longer end of unit mock exams to consolidate everything we have done so far